thegreatshono:

TUTORIAL TUESDAY: 22 PANELS THAT ALWAYS WORK!
Last week I was writing the next issue of Shadows of Oblivion and there are alot of panels where characters are just talking.  It’s always challenging to keep panels visually interesting when all that’s happening is talking.  So I had to refer to Wally Wood’s 22 panels that always work, to create interesting panels that weren’t repetitive and borring.
Then It dawned on me.  Most of you who who are following my blog and read my tutorials are very new to making comics. Most of you probably don’t even know who Wally Wood is, let alone his 22 panels.  Which is understandable, as he passed away before I was even born, and I didn’t even know who he was until I started making comics.
So first read up on this fantastic comic creator and illustrator.
Then Study his 22 panels that always work.  Because they do always work.  They’ll make your comic’s much more visually interesting when all people are doing is talking…
Tomorrow is page 19 of Shadows of Oblivion #2. Hope you’re enjoying the adventure!
Until then follow me around the web!
Like me on Facebook
Follow me on Twitter
Re-blog me on tumblr
And if you love my artwork don’t forget to pick up my comics!
And remember: Make Comics! Not Excuses!

thegreatshono:

TUTORIAL TUESDAY: 22 PANELS THAT ALWAYS WORK!

Last week I was writing the next issue of Shadows of Oblivion and there are alot of panels where characters are just talking.  It’s always challenging to keep panels visually interesting when all that’s happening is talking.  So I had to refer to Wally Wood’s 22 panels that always work, to create interesting panels that weren’t repetitive and borring.

Then It dawned on me.  Most of you who who are following my blog and read my tutorials are very new to making comics. Most of you probably don’t even know who Wally Wood is, let alone his 22 panels.  Which is understandable, as he passed away before I was even born, and I didn’t even know who he was until I started making comics.

So first read up on this fantastic comic creator and illustrator.

Then Study his 22 panels that always work.  Because they do always work.  They’ll make your comic’s much more visually interesting when all people are doing is talking…

Tomorrow is page 19 of Shadows of Oblivion #2. Hope you’re enjoying the adventure!

Until then follow me around the web!

Like me on Facebook

Follow me on Twitter

Re-blog me on tumblr

And if you love my artwork don’t forget to pick up my comics!

And remember: Make Comics! Not Excuses!

06 Aug 13 @ 4:00 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
Tutorial Tuesday: Comic Composition (part 2)

thegreatshono:

Okay so like a month ago I had done the first part of my Comic Composition.  There I talked about the bare basic fundamentals to the language of comics.  If you want to make comics either professionally or just for fun I highly recommend you go back and read that one.  There I talked abut  Panel DirectionPanel Layout, and Word Balloons.  Some of you you might read it and go “Duh Shawn, This is obvious.”  But it never ceases to amaze me on how some seemingly obvious fundamentals are lost to creators starting out.  So If you’re really new to making comics definitely go back and read it.

Today we’re talking about the next step. Remember that Comics is a language. There are rules to it so that everyone reading it understand what’s trying to be communicated. You can eventually bend the rules and be “artsy” about it, but You can’t do it successfully until you have a firm mastery of the rules and can execute them in your sleep.

Of course there are many many many more rules than are covered in these two posts, but I don’t want you guys to get overwhelmed.  So once you get this down come back and we’ll talk some more…

So lets get started:

1. Panel Layouts

2. Time Pacing

3.  Movement

This just scratches the surface. There is alot more to talk about in all of this. But a blog post isn’t really the proper place to write an entire book down at.  So we might expound on this more later, if you guys are interested.

In the mean time if there is something YOU want me to do a tutorail of, leave me a comment! I’ll make sure i incorperate it in future posts!

And don’t forget you can find me around all over the web.

Like me on Facebook

Follow me on Twitter

Re-blog me on tumblr

Check out my blog

And if you love my artwork don’t forget to pick up my comics!

See you tomorrow and until then use your time to make comics, not to make excuses!

03 Aug 13 @ 4:00 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
Tutorial Tuesday: Comic Composition (part 1)

thegreatshono:

So you want to make a comic book?  That is awesome!  Let’s make sure it doesn’t suck…

A comic book, though dominated by pictures, is more like a language than anything else.  It’s communicating a story, information, and/or ideas to somebody else.  In order to communicate clearly there are certain rules that need to be followed so that everyone understands what the story, info, or idea is trying to convey, much like a language.

There is alot of rules to comic book and sequential art composing.  So we’re going to do this in two parts.  Part one is the bare bones basics.  Next week will be part two, where we talk about some higher level concepts.  Still the basics, but part two is useless to you unless you understand this part today.  So lets get started.

1. Panel Direction

*side note for those who are unaware:  the word “manga” is the japanese word for comic. It is not an art style.  Though there are artistic styles that are nearly exclusive to japanese comics, the word manga is not the name of that style.  So when you’re saying “I’m making a manga” you’re not saying “i’m drawing in an eastern or japanese style,” you are saying “I’m making comics.”  and making your comic read from right to left, when you speak english, does not make it more “authentic,” it just makes it confusing.

2. Panel Layout

3. Word Balloons

So thats the bare bones basics in comics.  If you can nail down these three things, then at the very least you’ll have an comic thats clear and easy to read.  Next week we’ll talk about pacing, panel sizes, and depicting movement.  If you can nail down that lesson with today’s tutorial, then the only thing left to know is the actual drawing part!

Hoped this helped you guys.  If it did leave a comment and let me know!

And remember, we don’t make excuses here, we make comics!

02 Aug 13 @ 4:00 am  —  via + org  —  reblog

electricalice:

I don’t know if this can be useful to anyone. It’s not perfect by any means but perspective is a lot based on the artist own sensibility, I merely offer a starting point.

31 Jul 13 @ 4:00 am  —  via + org  —  reblog

ealperin:

psuedofolio:

psuedofolio:

Got some spare time? Make a comic!

Download the sample printable comic right here!

Hey internet, wanna try something silly? If you’re near a printer, and going to NYCC, you can print out a bunch of these and leave them at Comic-Con. It’s just a little something that helps demystify the whole comic making process.

This isn’t exactly self promotion, I don’t care to see my name or site on any of these. I’m just putting it out there, that making your own zine is really, really, really simple. And you can start as tiny as multiplying one page into eight. And one post into thousands.

^Very useful!^ :D

31 Oct 12 @ 2:35 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

Over on the El-Jay, Quickreaver asked me for some recs on how-to-comic sites.  Well, I’ve reblogged a few comic-specific tutorials here, and sometimes I like to wade through manga -apps on dA, but most of my suggestions are books.  I’ve never really done a straight-up rec post, so this is short and sweet.

These are some of my fave books that I’ve picked up in the last few years.  I don’t tend to use any of them as an exact script of what to do or how to do it, but I like to flip through them frequently for ideas and ponderings:

This is just a quick list of some things that have helped to inspire me the most.  I’m sure I’ve forgotten to list something, but these are books that are sitting immediately to my right on their shelf where I can stare at them.  I also pick up magazines like ImagineFX (I think their annual comic special edition is still out right now?) and of course, I still read some comics - though nowhere near as many as I used to.  Anyway, just dive in and play around and don’t be afraid to make a mess, because you’re going to learn something from each pic you do :)

So that’s my humble mini-list.  If anyone has more suggestions to add, or specifically websites like she’d originally asked for, that’d be fab.

Edit:  Sonicscribblings adds:

Love these books - I own all three :D Another I’d mention is Scott McCloud’s “Understanding Comics.” It really breaks the reading and creating of comics down to a science.
04 Oct 12 @ 2:15 pm  —  reblog
comicbookdeviant:

The Justice League // Art by Jim Lee

comicbookdeviant:

The Justice League // Art by Jim Lee

30 Jun 12 @ 10:37 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
bigbigtruck:

chipperwhale:

Some things I’ve taught myself through out the years. I have not gone to college for art or comics, these are things I’ve learned by just trying to make comics by myself.

 I’ve also learned this stuff on the fly, through reading and doing. Regarding that last one: you can also use other elements to guide the reader’s eye through the page - shapes of objects, perspective on elements that “zoom” from top to bottom or right to left, etc.

bigbigtruck:

chipperwhale:

Some things I’ve taught myself through out the years. I have not gone to college for art or comics, these are things I’ve learned by just trying to make comics by myself.


I’ve also learned this stuff on the fly, through reading and doing. Regarding that last one: you can also use other elements to guide the reader’s eye through the page - shapes of objects, perspective on elements that “zoom” from top to bottom or right to left, etc.
11 Apr 12 @ 6:41 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
philnoto:

Kitty and Lockheed

philnoto:

Kitty and Lockheed

03 Feb 12 @ 11:38 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
Something different for tonight.  I made a point to not draw something Supernatural, because I have a feeling there will be plenty of that to come.
I was reminded yesterday how much I do like messing around with watercolors in painter.

(Also had to make sure this was in before inevitable Tumblr explosion tonight)

Something different for tonight.  I made a point to not draw something Supernatural, because I have a feeling there will be plenty of that to come.

I was reminded yesterday how much I do like messing around with watercolors in painter.

(Also had to make sure this was in before inevitable Tumblr explosion tonight)

20 May 11 @ 6:50 pm  —  reblog
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